Harness Word of Mouth Marketing for a Sales Boom, with Bill Bice [Episode 733]

Bill Bice, CEO of Boomtime, joins me on this episode.

Key Takeaways

  • Boomtime brings scale and efficiency to marketing. They combine technology and expertise to provide marketing as a service. Aggregating data opens up insights into your buyers, whatever size your company may be.
  • Bill has founded several companies whose success correlates directly to the effectiveness of their go-to-market strategies. Bill started Boomtime to improve his companies’ marketing results.
  • Bill first asks a CEO from where their last couple of clients came. If they were referrals, that company is a prospect for Boomtime’s word-of-mouth marketing service.
  • Bill follows a structured interview process with new clients to understand their business. Boomtime provides a content-driven approach to marketing and positions the CEO and their business as thought leaders.
  • Boomtime helps you to do three things better: 1) capture the leads and referrals that are already coming in, 2) follow up on those leads, and 3) stay top-of-mind with the audience you are growing. Use CRM to track your clients.
  • Create great content for your audience about their problems and your solutions for them. Bill uses the insight-driven Challenger Sale. Use your insights to leave your clients better off because of meeting with you.
  • Gartner’s new research suggests that while buyers have access to all the information, they need sales reps to help them make sense of it. Sales reps must be consultants. Prospects you don’t sell can still give you referrals.
  • You can’t sell without relationships. You can’t sell only by relationships. The main advantage small companies have is putting a face on their business. Real people are behind the solution. “About us” is an essential page on your site.
  • Tell the story exactly how you want to tell it. Put passion into the bios, not just facts. Direct the viewer to the next page to visit. Drive the customer experience on your site.
  • SEO has changed dramatically. SEO suppliers charge $2K to $3K a month for effective results. But you don’t need it. Google now evaluates your website as a human does. Focus on a steady flow of great content to attract traffic.
  • Bill has used LinkedIn to build his business. He uses it as the ideal networking event — without the food. Grow your network. Don’t pitch in connection requests; post great embedded content and let clients come to you.
  • You can use a dedicated resource like Boomtime or someone in-house whose job is to run your CEO’s LinkedIn profile and send out connection requests for them. Activity creates conversations. Stay on top of them.

Episode Transcript

Andy Paul  

It’s time to accelerate. Hey friends, this is Andy. Welcome to Episode 733 that is 733 of accelerate, sales podcast of record. We have another great episode on tip for you today. On this week’s accelerator My guest is Bill Bice Bill is the CEO of boom time, a digital marketing agency. And in this week’s episode, Bill and I will be talking about how to harness word of mouth marketing to create your own sales boom. So in our conversation today, Bill and I dive into how to bring scale and efficiency to your marketing, how to leverage word of mouth, in your lead generation efforts, how to capture and nurture the leads that are coming into your business, how to use challenger sale methods to create great content, and how to drive the customer experience on your website. All that and much, much more.Bill. Welcome to the show.

 

Bill Bice  

It’s great to be with you. Thanks for having me on.

 

Andy Paul  

Ww, pleasure to have you on. So for folks who aren’t familiar with your company, Boomtown so tell us what you do.

 

Bill Bice  

Well, Boomtown is all about bringing scale and efficiency to marketing which I think is the thing that that the discipline of marketing has done a really good job of avoiding for a long time. And so we do marketing as a service. Our whole approach is to bring technology and the expertise for how to implement it and put it to work together. Because a lot of companies don’t, don’t really have the desire or bandwidth to implement all of the stuff that you really need in order to do marketing in a consistent and effective way. So, we just produce the end result and deliver that to our clients. And the thing that’s so much fun about that is we learn so much in doing that right about the data. And so we get to see the data across hundreds of clients. And so we just, you know, we see things so much more quickly, by aggregating all that together and seeing, you know, seeing that across a whole whole group of businesses with similar goals, interesting different business types, then so you can serve that sort of interesting, see if you could normalize data across various industries that to me would be be of interest. Yeah, that’s one of the reasons that we’ve really specialized in the sort of b2b and professional services area as well. Because we found that essentially the same strategies and tactics work across a lot of different industries, as long as we’re talking about things that are, you know, a high value, impactful kind of sale, hmm. The same approach works. And so being able to leverage that across all those different markets and you know, cross pollinate those experiences has been a lot of fun.

 

Andy Paul  

So you focus primarily on small business sounds like and what sort of what was the impetus to start this company was what was your background?

 

Bill Bice  

It was my frustration with getting marketing for all of my companies. You know, I feel like I was born an entrepreneur, I started a software company when I was 18. I knew I knew what I was doing. So it took me longer to grow that company, but we eventually became number one in our niche. I’ve gone on to to found or invest in, in a number of companies with a lot of b2b focus. And you know, amazingly, there’s this correlation to the cases where we really focused on going to the market and nailed it to the level of success that we have. And so you know, you do all this hard work to create a great product or service, how good you are at marketing really determines whether you get the payoff or not. And if you’re, you know, if you’re spending your own money on marketing, you really want it so you want a real ROI there. So I just, I found it a really interesting problem to go after.

 

Andy Paul  

And so you’ve been doing this, Alan,

 

Bill Bice  

for for six years in this this focus,

 

Andy Paul  

focus, and so takes a certain average customer experience with us. I mean, so they come to you, they say, a small business professional services provider and say, yeah, we need help. what’s what’s it look like for them?

 

Bill Bice  

So what I really want is a client. One of my first questions is always almost always when sitting down with the CEO, the business owner, I’ll say, okay, Where were your last couple of clients come from and why I’m looking for is Oh, it was a referral from, because that’s the kind of business where the approach that we take this is amazingly effective. And we talked about word of mouth marketing, right? one form of marketing that just absolutely works. And in this day and age, we have this amazing ability to really amplify the effect of, of word of mouth. And so that’s, that’s what we’re focused on. So we start by sitting down with a client, and we have a structured interview process to dive in to really understand their business. And the way I look at it is they’ve already done all the really hard work right there. They’re taking care of their clients. Now we get to do the really easy part, which is leverage that in order for more people to understand the great work that you’re doing, and so in the end, it’s it’s really, it’s really a content driven approach to marketing. It’s, you know, things that you’ve, you’ve certainly spent a lot of time talking about, but it’s really positioning that CEO and their business as thought leaders and building the foundation of their marketing. So over and over again, we run into the same set of issues like if we just put, we do three things better if we are better at capturing the referrals and leads that are already coming in for better following up on those leads. And then if we’re better at staying Top of Mind with this now our audience that we’re growing. So what we’re doing is just building that marketing foundation for business after business to do those things really well. It’s just, you know, essentially battling the salespeople are human. And so, like, if you don’t see a commission check in the next 60 to 90 days, that lead doesn’t tend to get followed up on right. But if we build it into our process and put marketing automation in place, and make sure that we’re following up on everybody, you know, really good things happen.

 

Andy Paul  

Yeah, I imagine a lot of the companies that you’re working with, have small sales teams, right?

 

Bill Bice  

Yeah, it’s typically two to 10 sales reps. Yeah.

 

Andy Paul  

Yeah, imagine they would appreciate that sort of support.

 

Bill Bice  

And it’s you know, some of this battling just the I mean, I’m a big fan of CRMs. But serums have long been built the wrong way right there for years. All right, we all face this battle. I mean, this is we’re in the business of doing this, and I have a tough time getting our sales team to use our CRM system. But yeah, the magic that happens if you actually capture everybody who’s in your audience, every client, every prospective client, you get them into that central database. And then you do the really hard part, which I mean, 90% of the effort should be around coming up with really great content, insight driven, new perspective that you’re bringing the, you know, the number one mistake in marketing is talking about yourself, right. And so if we just stopped doing that, if we focus on the challenges that our audience has, and we put our effort into creating really great content, and then we just get these functional pieces in place so that we’re capturing our leads and staying in front of everybody, you know, most businesses today They want is just sitting right there. But we have to put all this process into place in order to really make it work. Well.

 

Andy Paul  

Got it. Well, you start alluding to something that that I know is important to you, which you talk a lot about on the I know on your podcast, and which is the challenger sale. So you seem quite taken with it. So why is that?

 

Bill Bice  

Well, I really liked the approach. And you know, in the end, the challenger sale is just an insight driven approach to selling. And the bottom line is creating this experience where every prospective client that you sit down with is better off because they met you when they were not exactly. They’re in a better place. Because what you’re doing is leveraging your experience across working with hundreds or thousands of businesses like that one prospect that allows you to bring insight and perspective to them that they’re running their own company, but But they’re running their own company Hmm. And you have this perspective across the whole industry. So if you leverage that, and bring it to the table, it’s amazingly effective. And so what you see, I mean, all the research, the challenger sale was done in fortune 500 companies. But we’ve seen a tremendous amount of success taking those same techniques and applying it to the small sales teams that we’re talking about. And one of the stats that comes out of their research that that is just so compelling is that the best performing sales reps spend a third of their time building their own marketing material, right? Imagine if the company who’s in a much better place to actually do that than one individual sales rep is no matter how good they are, as you took the combined experience of your whole sales team and your client service operation, you use that to create this insight driven marketing material. Now your best sales reps suddenly have a third more time to sell. And you’re empowering your other sales reps to do a better job of taking that same approach that is so much more effective.

 

Andy Paul  

Yeah. I’m more of a skeptic on that whole thing. I mean, I think that, that, yeah, I saw the step similar, which was actually rep spent 35% of their time modifying marketing materials. But I don’t think they give him an extra 30% of time. You know, for decades, I’ve only spent a third of their time selling. And I don’t think that’s ever going to change. But to your second point, which is, yeah, let’s make them more effective in that time they have that they are selling. And that’s and to the other point you brought, which is relevant to the challenger. It’s just, yeah, be much more focused on what the buyer experiences working with you during that time, as opposed to making it about yourself.

 

Bill Bice  

Yeah, I mean, buyers are coming to the table, so much more educated now. And they have access to so much resources and information. I think the question you really have to ask yourself in running your own business is, are you going to be part of that education process? Are you going to allow your prospective clients to be learning from everything else and then really the only way you can create new sales opportunities is to become part of that process. And if all you want to do is take orders, that’s fine, but if you really want to drive your business and drive the sales process, then I think you have to get into the business of educating your audience and driving insight and perspective.

 

Andy Paul  

Yeah, and I think there’s, I don’t say it’s a new wrinkle but I think we’re gonna hear more about it because Gartner’s latest rev of research that’s coming out here next week, actually, at their conference in Las Vegas, which just FYI, people listening to this will been long gone by the time we hear this is the trumpet that the necessity for salespeople to help buyers now, yes, they have access to information, but now we need to help them make sense of it. I think that’s the next level of insight really is, yeah, you’ve got a lot of information, but not necessarily confused. I think this whole confusion that overwhelms ideas with buyers is overdone. I mean, we’re smart people. There’s been a book written by some professors at Stanford that talks about their research and says yeah, people aren’t overwhelmed by data. But they do want somebody to help them make sense of what they’ve learned. And I think that really becomes important part of this whole thing

 

Bill Bice  

couldn’t agree more and and you just see it in the more your self esteem is seen as consultants, the more word of mouth is going to work for you and you take every prospect you talk to even even someone you don’t sell becomes a referral source for you because you gave them value in that sales process.

 

Andy Paul  

What do you think we’ve we serve again, I hate to overuse my term of the word overdue not overdone but do you think we overdo this whole idea of of sales with being consultants because we I think they’ve been talking about the challenger sale so it’s, it’s more about I see it more as leadership, really Is that they talked about leading the buyer to a solution. And I’ve always thought that same thing is that you know, as an individual seller, you’re fundamentally in a leadership position. Because if you look at the responsibilities of leaders, one of the things they do is they enroll people behind a vision, they don’t inspire people to take action. And these are things that leaders do. And I wonder if is it really a consultant? Is it really leadership?

 

Bill Bice  

I think it almost depends on the salesperson you’re talking to, in terms of what’s the right way to give them a different way to look at what they do so that they move in the right direction. So if you have somebody who’s really good at the relationship, and really good at the sales technique side, they need to add that consultative approach to what they do in order to really leverage the strengths that they have. Then you can have somebody who really is truly a consultant, and therefore it’s not that good of a salesperson. And they really need the sales skills in order to be able to bring those things together. So it’s you who has to put all those pieces together to really be truly effective as a particular for b2b sales, where the, you know, the level of knowledge and experiences can be very high in these kinds of impactful transactions.

 

Andy Paul  

Yeah, a question. I’m sort of interested in your perspective on this idea? Because again, back to challenger sales, they talk somewhat disparagingly about what they can classify as relationship sellers. And I think, quite honestly, I think they completely misunderstand what a relationship means in sales. And sort of interesting, what’s your take on that was?

 

Bill Bice  

Yeah, I think I think they’re wrong about that in the overall picture of how you just read it. I think the piece that they have right is that when you talk about a very traditional relationship, only driven by a salesperson, they’re not going to be as effective. That’s really the point they’re trying to make, but they’re not doing it. Very clearly, because by far the most successful salesperson is someone who is really good at building relationships and leveraging them. It’s just, that’s not the only thing you can rely on, you’ve got to bring all these other pieces to the table. But would you rather have somebody who is, you know, is only good at understanding your business and, and isn’t able to build the relationship? And obviously, you’re gonna do better if you put both of those together?

 

Andy Paul  

Yeah, I agree, I think but I think where the misunderstanding comes from. I’ve been thinking a lot about this recently, because there’s a lot written online these days about people, again, denigrating this whole idea of relationships and sales and, you know, want respect and want a relationship yada, yada, which I again, don’t get me started on that one. is I think the, to be able to execute a challenge or sale you need to have a certain type of relationship with the buyer, right? You have to have trust, you have to have credibility, you have to have some acumen sort of leads back to trust. So I started looking at the construct of one answer Grant and his books talks about the difference between givers and takers. I think that if you’re that superficial relationship person that Yeah, the hail fellow well met stereotype, you know, used car salesperson, you’re a taker, right? You really don’t have anything to give you just some other times some other energy but at the end of the day, you’ve got nothing to give that really helps them. But if you’re a relationship person, then you have value for the buyer and effects that buying experience. And so I think people got their high horse about relationships. It’s like still and I think even unfortunately, Kevin and Brent’s fall into that trap a little bit with the book is that yeah, it’s not about friendships. I mean, for me to be a real value provider to you. You need to trust me you need to be enrolled in this vision, um, I’m creating and if you’re not, we don’t have that relationship. That’s Not gonna happen.

 

Bill Bice  

You can’t sell without relationships. So I think they have a I think they’re making a good point but did it in a way that it doesn’t really come across. And so it’s just that if you can’t be successful today just relying on going to lunch and playing golf. You really have to bring value to the relationship. That’s what they’re trying to say. I just don’t think comes across very Yeah,

 

Andy Paul  

yeah. Well, I love the challenger customer. I think that’s a better book, in my estimation. I love the challenger customer. And they talk about I think they reframe it. They talk about the more from the customer perspective, as you know, salespeople get sucked into the customers that will talk to anyone. Well, that’s to those on the surface, a superficial relationship. People on the sales side, that’s who they get drawn to. Right. Those are like magnets. Yeah, I get some of the customer side that will talk and I’m comfortable because they’re not challenging me at all. And I think that’s where a lot of this stereotype comes in.

 

Bill Bice  

I think that’s a great insight and what I’ve seen work really well is taking that challenger sale approach and applying it to the general marketing message that you’re pushing out to your audience. So do that same thing, challenge your audience, say, say things that are actually interesting, somewhat controversial, because that’s how you get attention to what makes, you know, makes your solution unique.

 

Andy Paul  

I agree. I agree, I think, yeah, I think we gravitate to all being the same.

 

Bill Bice  

And so many small businesses, they see: Well, the way I need to do what I need to do to compete against these much larger companies, I need to look corporate, I need to look like them. And I have exactly the opposite argument, which is the main benefit you have from your competitive advantage just to put a face on the business there, there’s real people standing behind your solution. So take full advantage of that. It’s the second thing that should be on your website. The first thing is, is what do you do? The second thing is Who are you And when you look at b2b websites, the second most visited page after the homepage design. As always, it’s always the About Us page. Oh, I thought it was pricey. You don’t get to price until they understand who you are, because they don’t care about whether they’ll ever do business with you without understanding who you are. They don’t your large competitor doesn’t have to do that, because they, you know, they’re sort of overshadowing the market with or with presence and brand. Your advantage is that you’re real. And so take, you know, put that right at the front of the story that you are telling. And then make sure that you’re really controlling that customer journey, because the other thing you’ll see is you’ll go to the About Us page and you’ll scroll down to the bottom. So one, it’ll be really boring BIOS, as opposed to something that really sells you on that team’s passion for why they do this right. Now you get to the bottom of the page, and there’ll be nothing there. It’ll be up to your prospective client to go figure out Oh, here’s what I ought to go. Look at next, right. Why not control that process? journey in the way you want to talk.

 

Andy Paul  

Right? So a question for it, because you you build a lot of websites, as part of your business seems like from from visiting your site is is part of the sort of sameness that we see across so many companies in the marketing, how much is that is driven by SEO and you know, the fact that people want to attract a certain keywords and if they’re trying to say, Look, I’m trying to, I want to be different, right, I want to have this this unique positioning, but don’t look for the keywords for it. So I got to start being like them and they were then up straddling and which doesn’t seem like it’s very successful.

 

Bill Bice  

Well, it’s not and competing for the same keywords that are what your large competitors are already successful with. As a small company, you really have zero chance of ranking. So it makes no sense to do that anyway. And SEO has dramatically changed over the last four or five years in the vast majority of what’s sold to small businesses SEO is I mean, that there are good SEO companies out there. But it’s hard not to just say most of it’s a scam. Because SBA has been so dramatically right. Anybody who claims that I mean, it’s not possible to guarantee that you’re going to be number one on Google for anything, right? Anybody who’s doing off site SEO work is not charging you at least two or three grand a month isn’t doing any real work. So it’s really easy to filter out whether they’re putting real effort into this or not, because there is no several hundred dollar thing that’s going to do off site SEO in a successful way. So that’s the negative part of SEO, the positive thing is that it has changed in a way that’s really beneficial to us from a small business side, because we don’t have to play. We don’t have to live in these two worlds anymore, where we’re writing for robots on one side, and then maybe paying attention to the actual people we want to sell on the other side. Google has gotten so good now. But they’re evaluating your website, like a human does. So we can give up a lot of those games and really just focus on what’s the best message that provides really valuable content to our best prospects. The reason Google gives away Google Analytics is because the data they get from that is invaluable, right? Somebody comes to your website and finds what they’re looking for and spends time on your website. Your SEO just went up, if they come to your website, because you gave them into getting there with the with, you know, keyword strategy that just happened to get them there. But then they immediately hit the back button. Your SEO just went down. Hmm. So we’re actually in a much better world, particularly for small business and SEO because you don’t have to play all those same games that that honestly did work 1015 years ago, but they’re, they’re really negative at this point. Interesting.

 

Andy Paul  

Yeah, cuz that’s, that’s, that’s, that’s a big industry, but the big thing, especially for small business,

 

Bill Bice  

and then the best way to be successful at SEO is actually getting tired. All these things together, because if we have a steady flow of really great content, and so you’re putting a couple of new longer form articles on your website every month, month in, month out forever. That’s great for SEO. And that same content is exactly what we’re going to email to people. We’re going to post on our website and we’re gonna stay in front of our audience. So we can take one core strategy and cover all of you know, all of these channels. Interesting.

 

Andy Paul  

Yeah, very interesting. I want to talk about LinkedIn because this is something that you’ve talked about and have used to build your business. And most people listen to the show or spend time on LinkedIn. What’s done it for you. I mean, what strategies have really worked for you on LinkedIn?

 

Bill Bice  

So the analogy I love for LinkedIn is it is the ideal networking event. I get to invite just the people I want to meet there. And, and I don’t have to eat high calorie food while I’m while I’m

 

Andy Paul  

i like bad food. Yeah,

 

Bill Bice  

exactly. There’s, there’s no, there’s no good, good side to that. And I think you have to take it the same exact attitude, right, you’re not going to walk into a cocktail party meet somebody new and immediately start giving them a sales pitch unless they actually asked you for it.

 

Andy Paul  

And that’s the unfortunate a lot of people do, but check.

 

Bill Bice  

It doesn’t work, right. So we have our experience, and you’re immediately finding a reason to go get another drink. And what works in that environment is also what works in LinkedIn. So you have to go into LinkedIn with the idea that I’m here to grow my network because I actually want to get what I want to give my network. That’s what creates sales opportunities. We all get the connection requests that are just veiled sales pitches, it doesn’t work anymore. So if if you go into LinkedIn, you can run a really aggressive connection campaign, but you gotta put the time into connecting with with people that really make sense that you really can bring value to and then if you take the same challenger concepts and apply it to that and and you get a steady stream of content that’s really insightful and helpful to your audience, then they’re, you know, they’re gonna, they’re going to come to you and it’s going to create sales opportunities. It’s just that work is hard to do, you know, it takes consistency day in and day out. So, if you’re an individual sales rep, and you’re or solopreneur, and you’re going to run this for yourself, then then I think you treat it like the golden hour of prospecting, you say, you know, eight to 9am, I’m going to spend on LinkedIn every single day. And I’m going to send out 30 4050 connection requests a day, I’m going to spend a lot of time in Sales Navigator, really nailing the queries and getting to exactly the right prospects that makes sense for me. And I’m going to put out you know, my my goal anytime I’m running a connection campaign for somebody in LinkedIn is that four to six activities a week, that’s now keeping you in front of that larger audience that you’re creating

 

Andy Paul  

four to six activities meaning posts and articles.

 

Bill Bice  

Post a comment on a post that you just made. And one of the great things about LinkedIn is it doesn’t have the duplicate content issues it does. So our idea of creating two longer form pieces of content a month, we can use that multiple times on LinkedIn, right? You know, write one article, and then post it three or four times pulling different pull quotes out of that one article, right? We get a lot more depth out of that content, the algorithm and LinkedIn is so much easier to understand what’s happening compared to Facebook. So right now, as we were talking, this may change by by the by the out but right this second, you want to make posts on LinkedIn that are not links because you will get twice the engagement twice, twice the distribution in in the feet of your audience, just by taking the link and putting them in the comments. Right. Right. And so the data is just really, really clear that the click through rate is just slightly less but because you’re getting twice the exposure, the overall result is much higher. And, and so whatever amount of time you’re spending on LinkedIn, you ought to be spending more today because the value is just incredible.

 

Andy Paul  

Yeah, and I know, especially small businesses, that this is often overlooked, right, much more rigid, not rigid, but stringent programs, you know, larger enterprises, they train their sellers how to use LinkedIn, and navigate and so on. But, like everything in smaller businesses is less. Less well organized sales processes, lead gen opportunities, and so on, which is obviously an opportunity for you. So how do you work with those sales teams then? Or do you as part of what your services you offer to help them become more proficient so I spend those golden hours?

 

Bill Bice  

Well, I actually think the most effective way is to have dedicated resources behind running these campaigns. Of course, that’s what we’re in the business of doing. But Got it, you want to do it yourself, you need to have an assistant in the company that this is what they do, you’re comfortable with that person having access to your profile, they’re sending out those connection requests. They’re staying on top of the conversations that are getting created. I mean, the problem is creating all this activity is, it’s a good problem when you raise conversations, that only works if you stay on top of it, and actually respond, right. And the profiles that work the best are the executive team. So I always want to start with the CEO, the CEO, the CTO, whatever the right. You know, the right contacts are for them in the prospect of clients that are going after the VP of sales. Use that because we’re going to create more sales opportunities for our sales team by leveraging CEOs’ profiles. Once we’re doing that, we’re putting out really great content, and we’re really understanding the engagement we’re creating. Then we get to the sales team. But frankly, we want to start with the executive team first because we’re just going to get better results from that

 

Andy Paul  

right Yeah, I think I think it’s, it’s We’re sorry at this, you’ve sort of talked about this inflection point, it feels like with LinkedIn, where just the last year there’s been the tidal wave of tsunami of of fake connection requests with, you know, as you said, failed sales pitches. Do you see LinkedIn doing something about that? Is there anything I can do? Because I think this is at least circles that I will talk to people and these people are pretty engaged on LinkedIn. A lot of sort of fading enthusiasm for it.

 

Bill Bice  

Well, LinkedIn has, you know, has you know, they’ve they’ve, they’ve really clamped down on the automation tools that have enabled a lot of that going on. If you do it. Well. It works extremely well. There, you know, there’s definitely the risk that the people who abuse the system are going to push it too far. But right the second in terms of the results that are We see this extremely effective, and you’re losing out if you’re not putting if you’re not putting that effort into LinkedIn. And the more people who come in with the right attitude for how to leverage LinkedIn, though, the more you know, the more benefit that we have. And what we’re really, you know, our goal is to get to this point where we start to really get organic growth out of, you know, get to that point where you have enough followers where you can switch to having a follow button instead of a Connect button. Amin and just following you on LinkedIn, because of the value of the insight that you’re providing. Right. That is our goal. Yeah. And it works so much better at the individual level than at the company page. We want to post content on it. But all the results come from the individual profiles, we want to connect

 

Andy Paul  

real people. Right, right. Yes, as we do in real life in sales, which is, you know, again, I think we’re having this inflection point in sales as well with All the sales engagement platforms and everything out there that we’re going through this period where they’re not being used to my way of thinking that are being used authentically, for the most part, and they’re creating. Well, we’re amplifying bad behavior, basically. But that will change them and convince this change that will change. I’m not sure what’s going to drive it but optimistic in that regard.

 

Bill Bice  

Yeah, I mean, Facebook is horribly abused. And yet, everybody’s still using everybody over 30 is still using Facebook. But I don’t think it’s going to change the value that we get out of LinkedIn, because there’s no network effect that is so powerful that comes with those challenges that just come along for the ride no matter what.

 

Andy Paul  

Yeah, I agree, unless something else comes up. I mean, that’s, I think just like Facebook, I mean, they are so huge, but at the same time, I remember at the start of my career, selling computers IBM had Almost 90% of the market that seemed like that was never gonna change and within 10 years it changed very substantially so

 

Bill Bice  

Here we’re offering the market is really unique because we have a winner takes all but yet that winner changes every 10 to 20 years. Yeah, so it’s a really

 

good dynamics. Yeah,

 

Andy Paul  

that’s a great way to put it. All right, well built and fascinating. I love to keep on going, but we’ve run out of time. So tell folks how they can find out more about Boomtown and connect with you

 

Bill Bice  

Yeah, so you can see exactly what I’m talking about. Come come to our site Boomtown calm Look, look me up on LinkedIn, you’ll see us demonstrating exactly what we recommend that you do for your business. I want as many businesses to do this as possible. You can follow in your footsteps Finally, and I’ve started my own podcast. Me to be word of mouth marketing podcast episode 11. I saw congratulations.

 

Andy Paul  

Yes. The average number of podcast episodes produced professionally Quit so seven. So you’ve, you’ve beat the average,

 

Bill Bice  

we are still going strong. And you know, my goal is just to lay out the things we’ve learned because I want I just love small business. I want as many small businesses to be doing the things that really work for marketing as possible. You just you gotta make the commitment and do it. I love talking to business owners about marketing. I’m, I’m at CEO of boom, time calm. So please reach out if you want to, if you want to talk about your marketing.

 

Andy Paul  

Perfect, excellent. All right. Well, Bill, thank you very much, and everyone else. Thank you for listening and we’ll see you next week. Have fun, thanks.

 

Okay, friends, that was my guest bill Bice. Join me next week as my guest will be Sean Shepard. Coming back for a repeat visit. Sean is founder and CEO of growth effects Silicon Valley venture capital partnership with an accelerator focused on sales, as well as an academy that trains people in sales, marketing design. Thinking and data science, and we’re gonna be talking about a lot of different concepts are familiar with the term first mover advantage, while we’re talking about what Shawn calls lasting, moving mover advantage, and how that can impact your business. So be sure to join us then. And before you go, don’t forget to check out the sales house. Sales house is my own growth training platform for b2b sellers. Just like you, you’re a seller who’s reached the limits of what the science quote unquote science selling could do for you. And you’re interested in learning about the art of winning, then come check out the sales sauce, you’ll learn how to master the human element selling to crush your numbers. So for more information, visit the sales house.com. That is the sales house.com. Okay, thanks again for joining me until next week. I’m your host, Andy Paul. Good selling doing

 

Bring DNA is a leading revenue acceleration platform that uses AI to help scale business growth. trusted by the world’s top sales teams across the globe. Ring DNA has proven to exponentially increase call Connect rates, opportunities and revenue wherever your teams live and work. So if your sales support team has gone fully remote ring DNA and arm your team with the tools they need to work from anywhere on the planet. Learn more at ring dna.com forward slash Andy that’s ring dna.com forward slash Andy